Movo - Zoom Audio Recording Comparison: New Zoom H1n vs Old H1

Old Dog, New Tricks – How the New Zoom H1n is Different from the Zoom H1

by Ben Gerstein January 12, 2018 3 min read

Old Dog, New Tricks – How the New Zoom H1n is Different from the Zoom H1

Zoom is one of the most trusted names in audio recording. So when they released a brand newdigital recorder to replace an industry workhorse like the Zoom H1, it’s big news.

The  Zoom H1n is a direct replacement for the Zoom H1. The leading communications brand has discontinued the old H1 model, so if you’re looking for an entry-level digital recorder, the H1n will be your only option.

The good news is that the H1n is a dramatic upgrade of the H1. Zoom has packed nearly a dozen new functions into the same tiny package (give or take two-tenths of an inch) while preserving the same reliable audio recording quality.

The question is: how is the new Zoom H1n different from the old Zoom H1? And is it worth your money to invest in the upgrade? Go over our Zoom H1n review below to find out.

Zoom H1 vs Zoom H1n: An Overview

Before we go into more detail, here's a quick review of the main differences.

The built-in X/Y stereo mic on the H1n has the same high-quality specs as the H1 (24-bit audio sampling at rates of 44.1, 48 or 96 kHz in WAV and MP3 formats), and has the same low-cut filter for removing low-frequency rumble.

In terms of construction, Zoom did well on the aesthetic upgrade of the new H1n. It still has the same durable plastic build, but H1n’s matte black casing is sleeker than its predecessor’s finish.

A more obvious change can be seen on the location of the buttons. The new H1n digital recorder has more buttons than the H1, whose controls were placed on the left side of the device. The buttons on the new design are right on the front, with settings viewable through the now back-lit LCD. It’s also worth noting that the Zoom H1n runs on two AAA batteries, not the single AA that the older model used to operate on.

What's New in the Zoom H1n?

On top of the updated looks and a more ergonomic feel, H1’s successor gives you access to these features:

  • Onboard limiter– This maintains a distortion-free signal up to 120 dB SPL, so you can cleanly record your band even when they turn it up to 11.
  • Overdub function– Now you can add as many additional layers of audio on top of a recorded track as you like. Perfect for creating richer sounding recordings right in your device.
  • Playback speed controls– For making transcription easy, whether you’re taking notes from a music file, speech, or interview. You can change the speed without altering the pitch.
  • Auto-Record, Pre-Record and Self-Time functions– You can set your H1n up in advance, then forget about it. These are great stress-reducing functions for the over-tasked multitasker.
  • Tone generator– This nice little feature means it’s easier than ever to calibrate your H1n and camera audio levels.
  • Improved LCD screen – The new H1n LCD screen is 1.25” in size and features a much more readable monochrome black-and-white display as compared to the more muddled black-tan display of the H1.

Similarities Between the Zoom H1 and H1n

The H1n still features a 1/8” stereo mic/line input that lets you record with your  external microphones. And just like the H1, it supplies 2.5 volts of plug-in power. The H1n also retained the USB port for providing a digital output of the stereo mix and allowing data exchange between the device and your computer. In addition to those capabilities, it allows the H1n to be used as a USB microphone and a microSD card reader.

The Verdict

All in all, the Zoom H1n is an across-the-board improvement and a worthy successor to an old favorite like the H1. It works well as a stand-alone recorder but functions even better when enhanced with the right  audio accessories, such as lavalier microphones.  Here are some Movo mics and accessories that pair perfectly with the new Zoom H1n. 

Movo LV1 Lavalier Microphone

Used with a Zoom recorder, the Movo LV1 clip-on omnidirectional condenser lavalier microphone is perfect for journalists and podcasters who want to conduct smooth, fuss-free interviews. A bonus with this mic: it's also compatible with smartphones.

Movo WS1 Deadcat Windscreen

Zoom recorder have superior audio recording capabilities that can catch even the slightest sounds. Keep your recordings clean by only picking up your subject’s words using the Movo WS1  furry windscreen. This breaks the wind and reduces noise by 24dB to 40dB so that you can capture broadcast-worthy soundbites even when you’re outside on a windy day.

Looking for something else? Have a look around at our full line of audio equipment and accessories. 

We hope you found this review helpful!


2 Responses

Movo
Movo

April 09, 2019

Hi Manuel, you can connect the headphone output of the H1n to the “EXT IN” on the Q4 to use the H1n as an external mic.

Manuel Calvão
Manuel Calvão

April 09, 2019

O ZOOM H1N pode ser também um “external mic” para a minha camera ZOOM Q4 como indicado para o ZOOM H1?
Obrigado e os meus melhores cumprimentos,
Manuel Calvão

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Movo's Blog - Tips and Tricks about Audio & Video Accessories

DIY Podcast Studio: Tips and Tricks for Quality Recording in Any Space

by Charles Laubacher September 30, 2021 3 min read

We cover tips and tricks for picking a room for podcast recording, and how to treat your room for better acoustics.

Read More
Microphones Basics: How to Use a USB Microphone to Capture Professional Voice Recordings

by Charles Laubacher September 29, 2021 3 min read

Recording voice for a podcast can be a tricky balancing act. Here's some advice on how to get your vocals just right. 

Read More
The Fundamentals of Podcast Recording: Capturing Audio for Your Podcast

by Charles Laubacher September 29, 2021 4 min read

Recording audio for the first time might be intimidating. Don't worry, we're here to help with some tips on recording audio for your podcast. 

Read More

Subscribe